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  • Hulu

    Some of Hulu's competitors include Netflix and Amazon. Previously, it was divided into free and paid tiers, with the free service limited in the amount of content accessible by users and accessible via PC only, and a paid service with a larger library of content and accessed via Hulu applications for various mobile and connected devices. The subscription service is, in turn, divided into advertising-supported and mostly ad-free tiers. In 2016, Hulu spun out its free content into a joint venture with Yahoo! called Yahoo! View and launched a live television streaming service on May 3, 2017.

    Key executives instrumental in the founding of Hulu include Bruce Campbell, Peter Chernin, JB Perrette, Michael Lang, Beth Comstock and Jason Kilar. The venture was announced in March 2006 with AOL, NBC Universal, now Comcast, Facebook, MSN, Myspace, and Yahoo! planned as "initial distribution partners". From mid 2007 to 2008, former Edmunds.com Digital Creative Director, screenwriter, and sociologist Marty Miller was the Fox Interactive Media (FIM) Director of Product for Hulu, running the Hulu launch team of (FIM) and NBCUni product managers and engineers. He wrote the Hulu Product Requirements Doc (PRD) of over 200 pages, while advocating Hulu pursue original productions, flexible subscription plans, and minimal ad pre-rolls on video clips/content. Marty also served as the Hulu supervising Creative Director over Razorfish/NY, which built the first Hulu destination website by traveling weekly to work at the Hulu Santa Monica office. Jason Kilar was named Hulu CEO in late 2007.

    Following the start of its service, Hulu signed deals with several new content providers making additional material available to consumers. On April 30, 2009, The Walt Disney Company announced that it would join the venture, purchasing a 27 percent stake in Hulu.

    In May 2016, Hulu announced that it planned to begin offering an over-the-top IPTV service with "live programming from broadcast and cable brands" some time in 2017. In late 2016, co-owners 21st Century Fox and The Walt Disney Company agreed to supply their channels to the streaming service, joined by Time Warner, which previously reached an agreement with Hulu.

    In early March 2010, Viacom announced that it was pulling two of the website's most popular shows, The Colbert Report and The Daily Show, off Hulu. The programs had been airing on Hulu since late 2008. A spokesman for Viacom noted that "in the current economic model, there is not that much in it for us to continue at this time. If they can get to the point where the monetization model is better, then we may go back." In February 2011, both shows were made available for streaming on Hulu again. The Daily Show was again removed from Hulu in March 2017 in order to push viewers to watch the program on Viacom and Comedy Central's apps.

    On January 16, 2012, Hulu announced that it would be airing its first original script based program, titled Battleground, which premiered in February 2012. The program aired on Hulu's free web service rather than on the subscription-based Hulu Plus. Battleground is described as a documentary-style political drama.

    On July 12, 2014, it was announced that Hulu had signed a three-year deal purchasing exclusive online streaming rights to the South Park library. Through the deal, the South Park Studios website became powered by Hulu video and featured advertising. Along with this, the domain name changed from "southparkstudios.com" to "southpark.cc.com". Previously, the show had been available on the television website Netflix. The new site launch caused some technical issues, which were resolved allowing fans to watch uncensored episodes and clips. For viewers outside the US, episodes and clips still stream through the "classic" South Park player and nothing changed aside from the new site design. A handful of countries also have their own localized versions of South Park sites, with the old experience.

    Hulu is unable to launch in Canada due to the relatively small size of Canada's online advertising market and because Canada's television networks already have the exclusive online streaming rights in Canada to several titles offered on Hulu, including many mainstream American television network programs. The absence of Hulu in the Canadian market raised concerns by fans of the sitcom The Mindy Project when it was cancelled by Fox in the spring of 2015 and subsequently picked up by Hulu; the show's Canadian broadcaster, City, subsequently announced it would continue to air the series in Canada. At present, Canadian consumers have access to several other streaming systems, including a Canadian version of Netflix, Amazon Video and Crave, with Crave streaming some programming from Hulu.